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2 edition of Review of the effectiveness of optometrists in the monitoring of diabetic retinopathy found in the catalog.

Review of the effectiveness of optometrists in the monitoring of diabetic retinopathy

Anita Lighthouse

Review of the effectiveness of optometrists in the monitoring of diabetic retinopathy

by Anita Lighthouse

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  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Public Health Directorate, Barking & Havering Health Authority in Barking .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementAnita Lighthouse.
SeriesPublic health research reports -- no.95
ContributionsBarking and Havering Health Authority. Public Health Directorate.
The Physical Object
Pagination9 leaves :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18285249M

Background. Approximat to , Norwegians have known diabetes [], among whom reported prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) ranges from 11% to 28% [].In the working age group, DR is a leading cause of visual impairment [].Among people with diabetes, 1% to 13% develop sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) and % to % are visually Cited by: INTRODUCTION. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual disability and blindness worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the prevalence of diabetes in the Eastern Mediterranean region is estimated to be between 5% to 15%. 1 In Bahrain, the number of diabetics is , 2 and the prevalence is 14%. 3 In a population-based visual .

  Ocular side effects of anticoagulants include subconjunctival hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage, orbital hemorrhage causing mass effect and exacerbation of bleeding from other ocular conditions such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative macular degeneration. Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of vision loss and preventable blindness in adults aged 20–74 years, particularly in middle-income and high-income countries. 1 In a meta-analysis of 35 studies done worldwide between and , researchers estimated an overall prevalence of 346% (95% CI 345–348) for any diabetic retinopathy, 696% Author: Stela Vujosevic, Stephen J Aldington, Paolo Silva, Paolo Silva, Cristina Hernández, Cristina Hernánd.

Sensitivity and specificity of Norwegian optometrists’ evaluation of diabetic retinopathy in single-field retinal images – a cross-sectional experimental Available via license: CC BY The first comprehensive book on the eye and vision in relation to diet and nutrition. Coverage includes overviews of eye diseases and vision loss, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, dry eye, and ageing. The book also covers many micronutrients and macronutrients.


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Review of the effectiveness of optometrists in the monitoring of diabetic retinopathy by Anita Lighthouse Download PDF EPUB FB2

To assess the effectiveness of optometrists as screeners for diabetic retinopathy using slit-lamp binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy through dilated pupils. Prospective study of a screening scheme. Screening was performed by 27 locally accredited optometrists in their practice.

PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of optometrists as screeners for diabetic retinopathy using slit-lamp binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy through dilated pupils. METHODS: Prospective study of a screening scheme. Screening was performed by 27 locally accredited optometrists in their practice.

The Cited by: Retinal photography through dilated pupils using 35 mm transparencies, or digital imaging, is therefore an effective technique for diabetic retinopathy screening. But whatever the imaging system employed, retinal photography has several inherent weaknesses as a screening by:   Purpose To assess the effectiveness of optometrists as screeners for diabetic retinopathy using slit-lamp binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy through dilated pupils.

Methods Prospective study of a screening scheme. Screening was performed by 27 locally accredited optometrists in their by: To determine which screening and monitoring tests for diabetic retinopathy are most effective and under what circumstances.

A systematic review of the English language literature, published from. diabetic retinopathy. The cost-effectiveness of screening Several studies from different countries around the world have been done to investigate the cost-effectiveness of screening for diabetic retinopathy, especially vision-threatening retinopathy–19 Cost-effectiveness of population-based screening programmes is heavily.

Optometry Australia Guidelines for the examination and management of patients with diabetes These clinical guidelines provide recommendations to optometrists on the assessment and monitoring of patients with diabetes and referral of patients with diabetic retinopathy for ophthalmologic assessment and management.

In addition to the location and current stage of retinopathy, multiple systemic factors influence the follow-up schedule for a diabetic patient. A careful review of systems can reveal important information to better define the patient’s risk of onset and progression of DR.

The Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT), for instance, found that intensive blood glucose control reduced the risk of eye disease by 76%, kidney disease by 50% and nerve disease by 60%. 2 According to the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), 50% of blindness caused by DR could have been prevented with the early.

Diabetic Retinal Screening, Grading, Monitoring and Referral Guidance 1 1. Introduction Overview Anyone with diabetes is at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy (DR). This eye disease is defined as abnormal retinal changes associated with diabetes, and it can lead to visual loss.

In New Zealand. Screening for diabetic retinopathy: the optometrist’s perspective Yousef H Aldebasi, Priya R Reddy, Vishakh G Nair, Mohammad Ijaz Ahmed Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraidah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a micro-vascular complication of diabetes affecting nearly all persons with.

Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include sudden changes in vision, blurred vision, eye floaters and spots, double vision and eye pain. However, in many cases, particularly in the early stages, patients may not have any noticeable symptoms at all.

This is where regular visits to your GP, and the optometrist, are important. The Dilated Retinal Exam. Sumimn-y of the evidence There are no ideal data for addressing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of optometrists in screening for diabetic retinopathy.

Data from the two relevant studies addressing referral on the basis of need for treatment [1,7] suggest point estimates of test sensitivities for optometrist screening of 48% and 87% Cited by: Abstract. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of vision loss among industrialized nations.

Landmark studies such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial have identified risk factors for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, including glycemic control, duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and male sex. Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of new cases of blindness among adults age 20 to 74 years in the United States.

1 Estimates have projected that bythe number of Americans 40 years or older with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy will triple, from million in to 16 million for DR, and from million in to. Optometrists play a vital role in helping to detect diabetes in the early stages when it will respond best to treatment.

So what is the optometrist’s role in diabetes. What is diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy occurs due to damage to the blood. Diabetes retinopathy screening and having your feet examined are part of your annual review, however, you may need to book separate appointments for these depending on how your practice organises these.

Your general eyesight should be checked either at your annual review or as part of your retinopathy screening appointment. In /93 an informal diabetic monitoring programme was attempted in the Kettering area involving essentially the optometrists on Northamptonshire Local Optometric Committee (NLOC); the scheme was centred around the commercially-sponsored care and record book 1 held by (the majority of) diabetic patients attending the Community Diabetes Centre Cited by: 5.

Introduction. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the world's fastest growing chronic diseases and a leading cause of acquired vision loss.

1 According to the World Health Organization, it is estimated that the total number of people with diabetes will double from million in to million by 2 Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a specific microvascular complication of DM, Cited by:   Refer any diabetic patient with sight-threatening levels of retinal disease to a retinal specialist.

This includes patients with clinically significant diabetic macular edema (CSME) or diabetic retinopathy that involves or threatens the center of the macula. The desired results of this activity are to enable optometrists to better identify patients with diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema and to improve how care is coordinated so that effective treatment practices can ultimately improve visual.

Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an anti-malarial medication that has in recent times been utilized as treatment for a variety of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, and other inflammatory and dermatologic conditions.[] Retinal toxicity from HCQ, and its analog, chloroquine, has been recognized for many years.[2,3] By Cited by: 4.I ntroduction.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common microvascular complication of diabetes, which is potentially blinding. 1 Key risk factors for DR include hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and longer duration of diabetes. 2 After 20 years, the majority of patients with diabetes will have some degree of DR.

2, 3 DR is defined according to the presence and Cited by: